Point Reyes

Point Reyes


To see the real California and miles and miles of nothing but deserted beaches and native California headlands, grasses and rolling hills, go 40 miles north of San Francisco to Point Reyes National Seashore. Established in 1963 by President Kennedy, it covers 65,300 acres and is home to 72 species of mammals and 350 species of birds. There are more than 140 miles of hiking and horse trails and 35 miles of bike trails. If you want water sports, kayaking and swimming are great activities at Drakes’ Beach, which has a visitor center. There are many scenic overlooks where it’s possible to see migrating California gray whales, harbor seals and sea lions. (The “Drake” is for Sir Francis Drake, the British explorer, who landed his ship, the Golden Hinde, on the coast of California in 1559 on his way to circumnavigating the globe.) The park headquarters is the best starting point for a visit here. Bear Valley Visitors Center will provide information on the many local trails and offers interpretive walks, including the very popular Earthquake Walk where you’ll see the infamous San Andreas Fault.

Point Reyes Lighthouse is at the end of Sir Francis Drake Boulevard and is open to the public. The lighthouse was built in 1870 but be advised that once the winds reach over 40 mph, the 300 step stair descending to the lighthouse is closed.





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